Transportation economics of coal resources of northern slope coal fields, Alaska
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Transportation economics of coal resources of northern slope coal fields, Alaska

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Published by Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, University of Alaska in Fairbanks .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Alaska.

Subjects:

  • Coal -- Transportation -- Alaska.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement[by] Paul R. Clark.
SeriesM.I.R.L. report no. 31, M.I.R.L. report ;, no. 31.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTN24.A4 A65 no. 31, HE199.5.C6 A65 no. 31
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 134 p.
Number of Pages134
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5169937M
LC Control Number74621480

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Transportation economics of coal resources of northern slope coal fields, Alaska (M.I.R.L. report no. 31) [Clark, Paul R] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Transportation economics of coal resources of northern slope coal fields, Alaska (M.I.R.L. report no. 31). Transportation economics of coal resources of northern slope coal fields, Alaska. [Paul Raymond Clark] -- Describes Alaska's northern coal fields, their environment, and systems for transporting coal to a potential market in Japan. Transportation economics of coal resources of northern slope coal fields, Alaska by Clark, Paul R., unknown edition. Coal. The North Slope of Alaska has significant coal resources and potentially some of the largest resources in the United States. Within this coal field, there are identified reserves of billion tons of coal, and hypothetical resources topping 3 trillion tons.

North Slope Coal Province The North Slope coal province (fig. 2) is the largest coal province in Alaska at approximat mi2 (82, km2). This province also has the largest resource estimate of trillion short tons ( trillion metric tons) hypothetical (Stricker, ) . (UCG) testing in the Beluga coal field» Coal-to-liquid plant considerations A study prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in divided the estimated coal resources in Alaska into three major provinces: Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet 6 (which includes the Study Area). Of the two. CONTRIBUTIONS TO ECONOMIC GEOLOGY COAL RESOURCES OF ALASKA By FARRELL F. BARNES ABSTRACT The original coal resources of Alaska, as estimated in this report, total , million tons, includ million tons of bituminous coal and , million tons of subbituminous coal and lignite. These total-reserve estimates reflect. Economics of arctic coal development There is a vast amount of coal in Alaska, primarily in the North Slope. However at present, almost none of this coal is classified within the recoverable reserves of Alaska or the US. This is fundamentally a question of economics since that is a defining factor in determining reserves.

Alaska has large coal reserves at the Beluga Coal Field in south-central Alaska, about 45 miles (72 km) west of Anchorage, and in the National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska. The only operating coal mine in Alaska, however, is the Usibelli mine near the town of Healy, located about miles ( km) south of low-sulfur coal produced there is transported to local power plants and is. This report examines the development and marketability of coal from three areas in Alaska. The three areas are the Beluga coal district in south central Alaska near the Cook Inlet, the Kukpowruk River coal district in northwest Alaska, and the Nenana coal field in central Alaska. At each of these. Alaska has vast energy resources. Major oil and gas reserves are found in the Alaska North Slope (ANS) and Cook Inlet basins. According to the Energy Information Administration, Alaska ranks second in the nation in crude oil e Bay on Alaska's North Slope is the highest yielding oil field in the United States and on North America, typically producing about , barrels per.   L.J. Campbell, Alaska Railroads (Alaska Geographic V. 19, No. 4, ) Alaska’s railroad history has been interwoven with Alaska’s coal resources almost from the beginning, and the black rock has driven the development of the Alaska Railroad since the days of its smaller predecessors.