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Catalysis by di- and polynuclear metal cluster complexes

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Published by Wiley-VCH in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Catalysis,
  • Metal complexes

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Richard D. Adams and F. Albert Cotton.
SeriesThe chemistry of metal clusters
ContributionsAdams, Richard D., 1947-, Cotton, F. Albert 1930-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQD505 .C3824 1998
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 555 p. :
Number of Pages555
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL675154M
ISBN 100471239305
LC Control Number97021333

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Transition Metal Clusters G. Süss-Fink and M. Jahncke 7. Catalysis with Dirhodium(II) Complexes M. Doyle 8. Catalytic Macrocyclization of Thietanes by Metal Carbonyl Cluster Complexes R. D. Adams 9. Catalysis of Rh, Rh-Co, and Ir-Co Multinuclear Complexes and Its Applications to Organic Syntheses /. Ojima and Z. Li Corpus ID: Catalysis by di- and polynuclear metal cluster complexes @inproceedings{AdamsCatalysisBD, title={Catalysis by di- and polynuclear metal cluster complexes}, author={Richard D Adams and Fatima A. Cotton}, year={} }. Book Series There are 38 volumes in this series. Published - About this series. This book series covers topics of interest to a wide range of academic and industrial chemists, and biochemists. Catalysis by metal complexes plays a prominent role in many processes. Developments in analytical and synthetic techniques and instrumentation. This book series covers topics of interest to a wide range of academic and industrial chemists, and biochemists. Catalysis by metal complexes plays a prominent role in many processes. Developments in analytical and synthetic techniques and instrumentation, particularly over the last 30 years, have resulted in an increasingly sophisticated.

  Homogeneous polynuclear metal clusters constitute a broad class of coordination compounds with important applications in catalysis. The current interest of synthetic chemistry in this field demands the exploration of new strategies to develop catalytic methods that work under mild conditions and maximize atom utilization. This review covers the application of polynuclear clusters . Homogeneous Catalysis by Organometallic Polynuclear Clusters. Journal of Cluster Science , 31 (1) Multiply-bonded dinuclear complexes of early-transition metals as minimum entities of metal cluster catalysts. Coordination Chemistry Reviews , , Coinage Metal Complexes of Bis-Alkynyl-Functionalized N-Heterocyclic. Metal cluster chemistry is at the cutting edge between molecular and solid-state chemistry and has therefore had a great impact on the researchers working on organic, coordination, and solid-state chemistry, catalysis, physics, and materials science. Hydrogenation by Cluster Catalysis. A metal cluster can be considered as a polynuclear compound which contains at least one metal–metal bond. A better definition of cluster catalysis is a reaction in which at least one site of the cluster molecule is mechanistically necessary. Studies on di- and trinuclear metal complexes bridged.

  (f) Metal cluster compounds. Analysis of the structures of newly prepared polynuclear complexes that contain two or more metals was, until recently, very difficult. However, with the progress of single crystal X-ray structural analysis, our understanding of the chemistry of polynuclear complexes is progressing quickly.   Catalysis by di- and polynuclear metal cluster complexes, Adams R. D.& Cotton F. A. ch. New York, NY Wiley-VCH. Google Scholar Braunstein P.& Rose J. Bifunctional and Tandem Catalysis without Metal–Metal Bonds Cooperative Activation of Unsaturated Substrates Cooperative Processes with Bimetallic Oxidative Addition and/or Reductive Elimination Polynuclear Complexes . techniques. The term “metal atom cluster” was introduced in by F. A. Cotton to designate a finite group of metal atoms held together mainly, or at least to a significant extent, by metal-metal bonds. That was necessary in order to differentiate this emerging class of compounds from polynuclear complexes in which the metal centers are held.